About your Search

20121226
20130103
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
jackson steps down, we assess the track record of the administration's environmental agency. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it
. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much of the world paused today to observe christmas. the day brought all the traditional rites of faith for christians and a new urgency to calls for calm in the troubled corners of the globe. thousands of the faithful greeted pope benedict xvi today at his cal bony overlooking st. peter's square. in that timeless setting,
>> brown: and ray suarez talks with journalist and author claudia kolker about what she calls "the immigrant advantage." >> i began to ask foreign-born people what i call the question: what's the smartest thing that people did in your home country that you want to hang on to while you're here and the rest of us ought to copy? >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: while much of the country kicked off the new year by going back to work today, washington said its goodbyes to the 112th congress, after a late night of final suspense on the fiscal cliff legislation. it gave the president much of what he wanted on taxes, and left republicans sharply divided. for president obama, the end-- for now-- of the washington budget drama, meant returning to hawaii today to resume his h
severe budget cuts with the november passage of governor brown's proposition 30, but voters didn't say yes to all taxes. an attempt to tax soda in richmond failed, as did a statewide tobacco tax on the june ballot. new districts drawn by a citizens commission and the voter-approved top two primary system shook up races for congress and the state legislature, putting a record number of freshmen in the assembly and giving democrats a rare supermajority in sacramento. it was the beginning of realignment of the state's criminal justice system, and voters approved reform of the state's tough three strikes sentencing law. the economy sputtered but finally showed signs of improvement in the housing and job market, but in silicon valley, the highly anticipated facebook ipo fell flat. the city of stockton made headlines as the largest city in the u.s. to ever file for bankruptcy. and a deadly shooting at oikos university in oakland left seven people dead and a community in shock. and obama care was given the seal of approval by the u.s. supreme court, now poised to take on prop 8 and the defens
mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and with it, more than $600 million in tax hikes and spending cuts. in a last bid for a deal, president obama stated his terms face-to-face to top republicans and democrats. >> congressional leaders arr
brown, who joins us live right now. mr. brown, congratulations. how have you done it? >> thank you, mainly through 35,000 men and women in uniform, but particularly through something called operation at attack where we send as many uniformed police officers as possible into areas where we have seen spikes and violence, particularly shootings. >> that sounds almost like a back to basics campaign. why was the decision taken to go in that direction? >> well, it started with mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly coming into the office right after 9/11 with a deep downturn in the economy, less tax revenue. we lost 6000 police officers through attrition, we have 6000 fewer now than we had then. that forced us to take a look at how we deploy officers into the city. instead of dividing them up as we usually did into 76 precincts, we focused better on defining exactly where the most violent crimes were happening and putting the biggest number of officers there, the biggest bang for the block. new recruits coming out of the police academy, they all went there. they all went there, teams of
>> brown: congress stepped back from the brink of financial turmoil, at least for now, after the house passed a tax plan late last night and sent it to president obama. good evening, i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, we look at how the vote came about and sort through some of the political consequences as a result of what's in the bill and what's not. >> brown: then, new killings in pakistan, we look at the uptick in violence against aid workers and women teachers with "washington post" foreign affairs reporter pam constable. >> woodruff: paul solman takes us inside a company that turns a profit by employing an unusual workforce. >> a massachusetts manufacturing firm founded in 1932 where the median age is 74 and rosa finnegan over there, is 100.
,000, when i get out i'll owe $2,000, so i said let me get a job. so i got a job, my coach at brown was a coach at brown, took the job at penn state, so i went down there with him, i was going to go two years. i got caught up in coaching. i called up and i said dad, i'm gonna coach. you're gonna coach? what did you go to college for? >> rose: (laughs) >> and i said well i think i can do a good job. he said well you make sure you have an impact. he said don't waste your time. >> rose: how long were you ace sis tonight to rick? >> 16 years. >> rose: 16 years? >> yup. i had started to work at penn state before i even graduated brown. in those days we used to have two weeks of reading for the final exams and the wholexd bit and senior paper and that kind of stuff. and i was a decent student so i was able to get down there and i worked for a week at penn state before i graduated brown and i stayed there for the rest of my life. >> it's so interesting because the reverberations of this remarkable conflict inside iran hadn't been felt around the region yet and i've always been struck by th
, chicago bears, cleveland browns, kansas city chiefs, philadelphia eagles, and san diego chargers all fired their coaches a day after the regular season ended. five teams also axed their general managers. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to ray. >> suarez: next, secretary of state hillary clinton was hospitalized yesterday after doctors discovered she had a blood clot. few details of her condition were initially released, but late today her doctors said the clot was located in a vein between her skull and brain. they stressed she did not suffer a stroke and is making excellent progress. dr. gholam motamedi, a neurologist at medstar georgetown university hospital, is here to walk us through the known risks and treatments for blood clots. i guess, doctor to start at the very beginning, what is a blood clot. >> blood normally has a tendency to coagulate or clot. if you take the blood out of the system, out of the circulatory system t will clot. if you are, let's say, laying down in a hospital, typically in a hospitalization, without movement, blood has a tendency to form cl
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)